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PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 9:11 pm 
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Solar Symbolism, Ancient and Modern

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/folklo ... olism.html

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The Alchemist’s Tale
Harry Potter & the Alchemical Tradition in English Literature

by John Granger
http://www.touchstonemag.com/docs/issue ... 9pg34.html

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Gallery of Rosicrucian Symbolism

http://www.prs.org/gallery-rosicr.htm

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RED MOON RISING



COSMIC MENSTRUATION

SYMBOLISM PERCEIVED IN

TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSES


by Robin Edgar

http://redmoonrising.homestead.com/index.html

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Read complete books and articles on: Symbolism
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http://www.questia.com/library/literatu ... bolism.jsp

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Mythic Reflections
Thoughts on myth, spirit, and our times
an interview with Joseph Campbell, by Tom Collins
One of the articles in The New Story (IC#12)
Winter 1985/86, Page 52
Copyright (c)1986, 1997 by Context Institute


Joseph Campbell is perhaps the world's foremost scholar of mythology. Among his many books are The Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Masks Of God, Myths To Live By, and his current multi-volume Historical Atlas Of World Mythology. Interviewer Tom Collins is a Los Angeles based writer and editor whose works include Steven Spielberg, Creator of E.T. (Dillon Press, 1983).


Tom: What does myth do for us? Why is it so important?

Joseph: It puts you in touch with a plane of reference that goes past your mind and into your very being, into your very gut. The ultimate mystery of being and nonbeing transcends all categories of knowledge and thought. Yet that which transcends all talk is the very essence of your own being, so you're resting on it and you know it. The function of mythological symbols is to give you a sense of "Aha! Yes. I know what it is, it's myself." This is what it's all about, and then you feel a kind of centering, centering, centering all the time. And whatever you do can be discussed in relationship to this ground of truth. Though to talk about it as truth is a little bit deceptive because when we think of truth we think of something that can be conceptualized. It goes past that.

Tom: Heinrich Zimmer said "The best truths cannot be spoken. . . "

Joseph: "And the second best are misunderstood."

Tom: Then you added something to that.

Joseph: The third best is the usual conversation - science, history, sociology.

Tom: Why do people confuse these?

Joseph: Because the imagery that has to be used in order to tell what can't be told, symbolic imagery, is then understood or interpreted not symbolically but factually, empirically. It's a natural thing, but that's the whole problem with Western religion. All of the symbols are interpreted as if they were historical references. They're not. And if they are, then so what?

Tom: Let's go carefully here. What are you calling a symbol?

Joseph: I'm calling a symbol a sign that points past itself to a ground of meaning and being that is one with the consciousness of the beholder. What you're learning in myth is about yourself as part of the being of the world. If it talks not about you, finally, but about something out there, then it's short. There's that wonderful phase I got from Karlfried Graf Durkheim, "transparency to the transcendent." If a deity blocks off transcendency, cuts you short of it by stopping at himself, he turns you into a worshipper and a devotee, and he hasn't opened the mystery of your own being.

Tom: You once called that the pathology of theology.

Joseph: That's what I would call it.

Tom: Walter Huston Clark says the church is like a vaccination against the real thing.

Joseph: Jung says religion is a defense against the experience of god. I say our religions are.

Tom: What do you do, then, if the experience is not to be found in religion?

Joseph: You find it in mysticism and get in touch with mystics who read these symbolic forms symbolically. Mystics are people who are not theologians; theologians are people who interpret the vocabulary of scripture as if it were referring to supernatural facts.

There are plenty of mystics in the Christian tradition, only we don't hear much about them. But now and again you run into it. Meister Eckhart is such a person. Thomas Merton had it. Dante had it. Dionysus the Areopagyte had it. John of the Cross breaks through every now and again and then comes slopping back again. He flashes back and forth.

I think Joyce is full of it. And Thomas Mann had it in his writing, though it isn't as far out as Joyce. It's strange how after Mann's death it disappears and you don't get it any more.

Tom: To quote your own words again, "A myth is the dynamic of life. You may or may not know it, and the myth you may be respectfully worshipping on Sunday may not be the one that's really working in your heart and the one that's out there in the view of your religious instructors."

Joseph: Yes. I would say that's a proper statement, and I would say it again.

Tom: How do you unite those two dynamics?

Joseph: By placing the emphasis on your own inward dynamic and then filtering out of the inheritance of traditions those aspects that support you in your own inward life. This means not being tied to this, that, or another tradition, but letting the general comparison . . . See, I'm very much for comparative studies of mythology. I think one of the problems today is that society has moved into a multicultural relationship that renders archaic these culture-bounded mythological systems - like the Christian, the Jewish, the Hindu.

By getting to know your own impulse system and its images and the things you really are living for, and then to get support for - you might say - universalizing and grounding this personal mythology, you can find support in the other mythologies of mankind.

Tom: What are the purposes of myth?

Joseph: There are four of them. One's mystical. One's cosmological: the whole universe as we now understand it becomes, as it were, a revelation of the mystery dimension. The third is sociological, taking care of the society that exists. But we don't know what this society is, it's changed so fast. Good God! In the past 40 years there have been such transformations in mores that it's impossible to talk about them. Finally, there's the pedagogical one of guiding an individual through the inevitables of a lifetime. But even that's become impossible because we don't know what the inevitables of a lifetime are any more. They change from moment to moment.

Formerly, there were only a limited number of careers open to a male, and for the female it was normal to be a mother or a nun or something like that. Now, the panorama of possibilities and possible lives and how they change from decade to decade has made it impossible to mythologize. The individual is just going in raw. It's like open field running in football - there are no rules. You have to watch everything all the way down the line. All you can learn is what your own inward life is and try to stay loyal to that.

Tom: How do you learn that?

Joseph: I don't know. Some people learn it early; some never learn it.

Tom: What kind of a mythology do we have today? What kind should we have?

Joseph: I won't say what kind of mythology we have because I don't think we have a generally functioning mythology. I would say that in terms of the sociological aspects of mythology, and perhaps this is a sentimental impossibility, we should see the total, global, society as the community of interest.

Tom: I thought myths were always tied to a specific group or place.

Joseph: That's right. But when you can fly from New York to Tokyo in a day, you can no longer say that's an incredible span of consciousness to include as one unit. The total globe is the society. And in fact, economically that is so.

Tom: I think it's interesting that some people have started to combine ancient wisdom with modern insights - people like Jean Houston, Michael Harner, Joan Halifax, and Elizabeth Cogburn.

Joseph: If it makes sense, what it would seem to me to suggest is that a harmonization of our lives with the order of nature is what's required.

Tom: Many of these people are also interested in the creation of rituals. What role does ritual play in mythology?

Joseph: A ritual is the enactment of a myth. And through the enactment it brings to mind the implications of the life act that you are engaged in. Now, people ask me, what rituals can we have today? My answer is, what are you doing? What is important in your life? What is important, they say, is having dinner with their friends. That is a ritual.

This is the sense of T.S. Eliot's The Cocktail Party. A cocktail party is a ritual. It is a religious function in that way, and those people are engaged in a human relationship thing. This is the Chinese idea, the Confucian idea, that human relationships are the way you experience the Tao. Realize what you're doing when you're giving a cocktail party. You are performing a social ritual. You are conducting it when you sit down to eat a meal, you are consuming a life.

When you're eating something, this is something quite special to do. And you ought to have that thought when you eat a carrot as well as when you eat an animal, it seems to me. But you don't know what you're doing unless you think about it. That's what a ritual does. It give you an occasion to realize what you're doing so that you're participating in the inevitable energy of life in its exchanges. That's what rituals are for; you do things with intention, and not just in the animal way, ravenously, without knowing what you're doing.

This is true also of sex. People who just engage in sex as a fun game, as something exciting like that, don't realize what they're doing. Then you don't have the sacramentalization. And the whole reason marriage is a sacrament is that it lets you know what the hell is correct and what isn't, and what's going on here. A male and female coming together with the possibility of another life coming out of it - that's a big act.

Tom: What does the term "transcendent" mean, in von Durckheim's phrase, "transparent to the transcendent"?

Joseph: The simple meaning of the term is that which goes beyond all concepts and conceptualization, or that which lies beyond all conceptualization.

Tom: Where does this experience come from?

Joseph: Your life is your experience of transcendent energies because you don't know where your life comes from, but you can experience them. We're experiencing them right here, just by sitting on them and having them bubble up.

Tom: Are you using "transcendent" as another term for God?

Joseph: If you want to personify it. Brahman is the Sanskrit way of talking about it. Manitou is the Algonquin way, Orinda is the Iroquois, Owacan is the Sioux.

Tom: Jahweh?

Joseph: Jahweh is personified. He is it.

Tom: We can't speak the name, though, because he is beyond ....

Joseph: Well, it ought to be, but we know all about him, or he's told us all about himself and how we ought to behave. The basic mythological concept is transcendent of personification. Personification is a concession to human consciousness so that you can talk about these things.

Tom: Do you mean that if the infinite reveals itself to you, your little mind responds by saying "God spoke to me" because it can only grasp what happened in its limited terms?

Joseph: That's right.

Tom: I gather you're not terribly fond of the Bible.

Joseph: Not at all! It's the most over-advertised book in the world. It's very pretentious to claim it to be the word of God, or accept it as such and perpetuate this tribal mythology, justifying all kinds of violence to people who are not members of the tribe.

The thing I see about the Bible that's unfortunate is that it's a tribally circumscribed mythology. It deals with a certain people at a certain time. The Christians magnified it to include them. It then turns this society against all others, whereas the condition of the world today is that this particular society that's presented in the Bible isn't even the most important. This thing is like a dead weight. It's pulling us back because it belongs to an earlier period. We can't break loose and move into a modern theology.

One of the great promises of mythology is, with what social group do you identify? How about the planet? To say that the members of this particular social group are the elite of God's world is a good way to keep that group together, but look at the consequences! I think that what might be called the sanctified chauvinism of the Bible is one of the curses of the planet today.

Tom: There's a lot of interesting material in the Old Testament, isn't there? For instance, it says that God created everything except the water.

Joseph: You've put your finger on it. The water I is the goddess. You see, what happens in the Old Testament is that the masculine principle remains personified and the female principle is reduced to an element. The first verse says when God created, the breath of God brooded over the waters. And the water is the goddess.

Tom: I assume you don't believe in an actual, literal seven days of creation.

Joseph: Of course not. That has nothing to do with the actual evolutionary story as we now get it.

Tom: How do you reconcile these two accounts?

Joseph: Why should one bother to, any more than you would try to reconcile the Navajo story?

Tom: I remember hearing a wonderful lecture by the late Louis Leakey in which he insisted that there was no conflict between the Genesis account of creation and what he had discovered.

Joseph: Well, it is in conflict because he didn't read it carefully enough. There are two Biblical accounts, one in the first chapter and one in the second, and they're quite contrary to each other.

It's about time we stopped feeling that we have to believe in the Bible. I'd just as soon try to work out the Navajo thing, where they come up through four worlds. One is red, one yellow . . .

Tom: But if you throw out the Bible as history, don't you also throw it out as a moral imperative?

Joseph: Yes. I don't think the Bible is anybody's moral imperative, unless you want to be a traditional Jew. That's what the Bible tells you.

Tom: Doesn't it tell you how to be a good person?

Joseph: No.

Tom: Lots of people think so.

Joseph: Just read the thing. Maybe it gives you a few hints, but the Bible also tells you to kill everyone in Canaan, right down to the mice.

Tom: What was the passage you quoted to justify their exclusivity ideas?

Joseph: "There is no God in all the world but in Israel." That leaves everybody out except the Jews. This is one of the most chauvinistic views of morality.

One of the great texts is in Exodus, when the Jews are told to kill the lambs and put the blood on their doorsteps so the angel of death won't kill any of their children, but will kill the first children of the Egyptians. And the night before they leave, they're to invite their Egyptian friends to lend them their jewels and so on. Then the next night, they run off with the jewels, and the text says, so they fleeced the Egyptians. No, so they despoiled the Egyptians. You call this good ethics?

Tom: What's the background of something like Cain and Abel?

Joseph: There's a very amusing Sumerian dialogue that appeared about 1500 years earlier than the Cain and Abel story. It's about a herder and an agriculturalist competing for the favor of the goddess. The goddess chooses to prefer the agriculturalist and his offering. Well, the Jews come into this area, and they're not agriculturalists, they're herders. And they don't have a goddess, they have a god. So they turn the whole thing upside down, and make God favor the herder against the agriculturalist.

The interesting thing is that throughout the Old Testament, it's the younger brother who overturns the older brother in God's favor. It happens time and time again. This is simply a function of the fact that the Jews come in as younger brothers. They come in as barbaric Bedouins from the desert, into highly sophisticated agricultural areas, and they're declaring that although the others are the elders - as Cain was, the founder of cities and all that - they are God's favorite. It's just another form of sanctified chauvinism. You understand the view of exclusive religion, don't you - "You worship God in your way, I'll worship God in his."

Tom: I gather there were a number of East-West conflicts in the early church. I find Pellagius a fascinating figure, for example.

Joseph: Pellagius in the fourth century was either a Welshman or an Irishman, I think. He upheld the individualistic Western tradition against what I would call the tribalism of the East, and was considered a heretic. He stated the main points against the doctrines of which St. Augustine, his contemporary, was the champion. One was the doctrine of original sin. Pellagius said, you cannot inherit another's sin. Therefore, Adam's sin is not inherited by anybody.

Tom: The sins of the father are not visited upon the son?

Joseph: That is all Eastern philosophy, not European. Another thing Pellagius said is that you cannot be saved by another's act. That takes care of Jesus on the cross and knocks the whole thing out. Of course that was rejected. Pellagius was defending a doctrine of individual responsibility. I don't know where it comes from, but certainly it was typical, I would say, of European as opposed to Eastern points of view. You were an individual, not merely the member of a group.

Tom: That sounds like the line in the King Arthur legend . . .

Joseph: "Each knight entered the forest at a point he had chosen, where it was darkest and there was no way or path." That's from The Quest of the Sangral, 1215 or so in France.

Tom: How do they expect to find their way then?

Joseph: By questing.

Tom: And that's what we all do in life?

Joseph: Yes. Otherwise, you'd follow someone else's path, follow the well-tried ways. No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities. It's a shame to waste those by doing what someone else has done.

Tom: You once said that no human society has been found where mythological motifs are not to be found and celebrated - "magnified in song and ecstatically experienced in light and power and vision." What about ours?

Joseph: What has happened in ours is that on the official level the accent is on economics and practical politics, and there has been a systematic elimination of the spiritual dimension. But it exists in our poets and our arts. It does. You can find it here. It's in a recessive condition, but otherwise people wouldn't have any spiritual life at all.

Tom: Isn't it alive in some phases of the ecology movement as well?

Joseph: Yes. And this interest now in the American Indian lore, isn't this interesting? The brutalized, rejected people - they've got the message that this country is waiting for.

There's an awful saying of Spengler that I ran into in a book of his, Jahre der Entscheidung, Year of Decision, which is the years we live in now. He said, "As for America, it's a congeries of dollar trappers, no past, no future." When I read that back in the 30s I took it badly. I thought it was an insult. But what is anybody interested in? And then Lenin says, "When we get ready to hang the capitalists, they'll compete to sell us the rope." And that's what we're doing. Nobody's thinking of what their culture represents. They're wondering whether the farmer in the Midwest will vote for you because you sold their wheat to the Russians, or what not. It's a terrible lack of anything but economic concerns that we're facing. That is old age and death; that is the end. That's as I see it. I have nothing but negative judgments in respect to that.

And look at what people are reading in the papers. You get into the subways and people are all reading the same thing - this murder, that murder. This rape, this divorce. What topics to be mentating on! This journalistic accent in our lives is murder. Murder.

Tom: You don't see the struggle ending? There's no kind of world order that could bring that about?

Joseph: It would have to be a world order, but then there would be struggle within it, just as there is struggle within our United States order. No revolution has ever taken me in. I've known too many revolutionaries.

Tom: If the only myths that exist then are the ones that everyone believes in - Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism - can't people create a new one that would meet today's needs?

Joseph: No, because myths don't come into being like that. You have to wait for them to appear. But I don't believe anything of that kind will happen because there are too many points of view floating around the world. All myths so far have been within bounded horizons, and people have to be in accord with their life dynamics, their life experiences.

Tom: The ancient Greeks were surrounded by the presence of gods and statues and reminders of gods.

Joseph: But that doesn't work any more. Christianity isn't moving people's lives today. What's moving people's lives is the stock market and the baseball scores. What are people excited about? It's a totally materialistic level that has taken over the world. There isn't even an ideal that anybody's fighting for.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



My turn. I'd like to add my comments to those of Joseph Campbell with regard to the Bible. My intention in including his comments was not to disparage the traditions based on the Bible relative to other major traditions, such as Hinduism or Buddhism. From my point of view, the sacred literature of all these traditions is written in the language of the Empire Era, and is deeply entangled with warlord consciousness. If we are to move forward, we need to look at these texts with clear eyes, able to see tribal chauvinism, male chauvinism, militarism, etc., for what they are. Only then will we be able to translate the wisdom they do have into a fresh language appropriate to the Planetary Era

http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC12/Campbell.htm

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YOU ARE THE STARRING CHARACTER IN THE STORY THAT IS LIFE
Like his mentor Joseph Campbell, Jonathan Young finds archetypes in fairy tales and other myths.
Donna Kennedy, The Press-Enterprise (Riverside, California)
Jonathan Young, Ph.D., told a lively version of "Hansel and Gretel" to his audience at Unity Community Church in Hemet on Sunday.

The running commentary that accompanied his storytelling illustrated Young's notion that each person is living out a personal story, which is an example of the timeless patterns or archetypes found in fairy tales and other myths. This conclusion came from Young's experience assisting with seminars by the late mythologist Joseph Campbell at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Carpinteria, where Young was a psychology professor.

Although Campbell wrote and edited more than 20 books, including the best-selling The Hero With a Thousand Faces, his interviews with Bill Moyers, first televised in 1987, gave him a whole new audience. In The Power of Myth, Campbell showed how people today can enrich their lives by looking at the hidden meanings in tales from different cultures.

Young was founding curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library at the institute and is now a full-time storyteller, lecturer and writer. During his 10-year association with Campbell, Young was interested professionally in the similarities Campbell found between spirituality and psychology.

Personally, Young concluded that we're living mythic lives. Like his mentor, Young sees fairy tales as one source of wisdom. By their method of interpretation, the tales can be symbolic road maps. For instance, "Hansel and Gretel" is a story of poverty, survival and hard times, Young said. The stepmother convinces the father that they must abandon the children in a deep dark forest or the family will starve to death. A bird leads the children to the edible house of a witch, who intends to fatten them up and eat them. Gretel pushes the witch in the oven, and the children fill their pockets with food and treasure. The stepmother dies of starvation, and the children return home and save their emaciated father.

If interpreted psychologically, the father could represent that part of a person who is in charge, but feels weak and ineffective. The stepmother might symbolize the negative part of the self that doesn't act in your best interests. And the children may stand for the creative, playful part of a person. Like the parents in the story, people pressured for resources, time or energy, may make drastic decisions, said Young. If they decide to focus strictly on goals and abandon the children, the vitality of life drains away.

At first, Hansel is the stronger of the two children with simple straight-forward ideas, like leaving a trail so they can find their way back home, said Young. Gradually Gretel's more complicated, intuitive leadership takes charge. The story is suggesting that we need to made that shift, Young said.

Young also pointed out that the children come away from the witch with her magic, her power. If they had found their way out of the forest without confronting her, the experience would not have been as valuable. This comes from going into the heart of darkness and facing the inner witch, Young said.

Tacked on to the end of the story is the line: There goes a mouse. Whoever can catch it can make a fine hat of it. It seems to be a non sequitur, Young said that mice once were considered emissaries between earth and the underground, which was the sacred or the unconscious. And that hats had to do with jobs or identity. So, if you catch the humble mouse - seemingly inconsequential in the story - perhaps you can catch the elusive symbols and make something out of it in terms of identity, role, task or calling, said Young.

If we look closely at the stories that have mattered to us, we can find an enormous amount about what we're up to in this life, about what we are to do, what is in our nature, he said. Campbell called it following your bliss - what you're good at, what captivates you. Usually that is really hard work, but you need to do it.

Campbell said that when you follow your bliss, doors will open, help will come, things will be possible. This was very true for him. He made the 'wrong choices,' passed up all kinds of things - a doctorate, good teaching posts - and still he became world famous because he was so good at what he did, Young said.

To those curious about their stories, Young suggests the following exercise:


Take a separate sheet of paper for each five years of your life and write down the stories that made an impression on you. This includes television commercials, song lyrics, movies, bedtime stories as well as works of fiction and nonfiction. Don't do it in one sitting. More stories will come to you over time. You'll probably have a lot of variety, but look for similar threads running through your lists.


If your lists are filled with comedy and humor, maybe you're a trickster who likes bumping things to see what happens. If you loved biographies of Clara Barton and Florence Nightingale, perhaps you are a healer. There are two reasons to know your story, says Young. One is to appreciate it, to celebrate it, to know what a wonderful novel that you're living, he says. If you aren't the star, if you see yourself as a supporting character, you're in the wrong story.

Secondly, you may want to look at your options and put a particular spin on your story. For example, if you're under pressure and have to decide what to cut out, Hansel and Gretel may be your story. But you can choose to keep the children - creative or leisure activities - rather than sacrifice them to do more work, as the critical stepmother self demands.

A little difference can make an enormous change in the outcome, Young says.

http://www.folkstory.com/campbell/riverside.html

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"We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.

You must have a room, or a certain hour or so a day, where you don't know what was in the newspapers that morning... a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be."
Joseph Campbell
US folklorist & expert on mythology (1904 - 1987)

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The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life and Work

Campbell, Joseph. (edited by Phil Cousineau). (1990)
San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco.


ISBN: 0-06-250171-2

Description: Paperback, xxxii + 255 pages.

Contents: Foreword by Stuart L. Brown, introduction by Phil Cousineau, editor's acknowledgments, chronology of Joseph Campbell's life, 8 chapters, Epilogue: The Tiger and the Goat, books by Joseph Campbell, bibliography, contributors, credits, index.

Note: This is the print version of the movie The Hero's Journey: The World of Joseph Campbell. "Between 1982 and early 1985, a production crew followed Campbell around the country, videotaping his last major lecture tour. ... We now had a mother lode of fifty hours of Campbell's most powerful lectures, which will be available forever." (Foreword, Stuart L. Brown, page ix)

Excerpt(s): GROF: I would like to bring in material from a somewhat different area. I am a psychiatrist and I've been interested in unusual states of consciousness. In psychedelics, for example, you see that people have a lot of geometric visions, a lot of abstract visions, which can be very simple, or spirals, or phosphenes. But they also have some rather complex images that some people compare to arabesques, to elements in Muslim mosques or Gothic cathedrals.

If the process deepens further they start experiencing elements of the birth process, confronting death, powerful death-reversing sequences of the kind Joseph mentioned, that are enacted in certain aboriginal rites of passage. But then there seems to be another vast area in the psyche where people seem to move into mythological realms. But what's amazing is not only that this mythological realm literally erupts into the psyche but that it crosses the culture barriers. Somebody who might be Jewish or Christian at this point will start experiencing mythology of the pre-Columbian period.

CAMPBELL: People who have taken some of the psychedelic mushrooms that were used in Middle America have told me that they begin to have images that resemble those of the Aztec gods. Have you heard of this kind of thing?

HIGHWATER: Yeah, I've heard of it.

CAMPBELL: Of course, I haven't done it myself, so I can't say.

HIGHWATER: I've heard of it, but I wonder how much of that may be autosuggestive.

CAMPBELL: But I was speaking about someone who's rather serious about this, Albert Hofmann, the man who synthesized LSD, and who was very much interested in this matter. The very special qualities of those Toltec deities-I couldn't believe it! At least this is a report from somebody who I regard as at least a reputable authority in these matters. I was trying to associate this with what you were saying-that certain psychedelics produce images of this type; others produce images of another type.

Among the Huichol Indians, for instance, the peyote is regarded as a good psychedelic entity; but then there is the counter one, the jimson weed, which is regarded as negative, and these two are opposed to each other. It must be the result of different images coming out of this experience from those that come out of the other one.

ROGER GUILLEMEN: But yet, if you study something like psychedelic experiences, you also have to consider green tea, which is loaded with caffeine or molecules like caffeine. And it's very well know that this has a profound influence on the function of some people. The mode of action is very well understood on these enzymes on the brain, which actually excite the functions of the brain so that this is a statement of fact.

So does this relate to the brightness of the young Japanese? It's hard to say, but I don't think you would get that kind of stimulation from milk or Perrier water.

HIGHWATER: I just meant that there have been a lot of discussions, as Campbell knows, about the iconography of Middle America and Andean America that may be identified with what was fundamentally a drug-oriented culture.

CAMPBELL: Oh, boy, they really were drug-oriented! [laughter].

HIGHWATER: Yes, so it's very possible that after all those visions there could very well arise some art. But I wonder if we would really like to impose the concept on the entire world of art of the Freudian notion that art is nothing more than a result of dietary disturbance or psychological disturbance.

I would like to think of art as so fundamental that it existed in concentration camps. Music was written in concentration camps, opera was written there. We have come to think of these things so much as a product of an elite leisure society. But, as you say, art seems to be such a fundamental human expression that it would seem to exist whether we are using jimson weed or not. These may be lubricants to a kind of experience, but perhaps what we're talking about predates both psychologically and biologically any of these effects.

CAMPBELL: Oh, I do think they do. In fact most artists have not been taking drugs. And those who did take drugs, you can see it in their art, in the very special effect that comes along. In English literature you have Coleridge as an example of someone who was doing a certain kind of work then started taking opium and he had a season of great productivity and then it all ran out.

GUILLEMEN: As Rimbaud seems to have.

CAMPBELL: Exactly the same.

GUILLEMEN: What we are talking about, or perhaps trying to discuss and dissect, is what was the very beginning-of the very earliest manifestations of what was later to be called art. I would not be at all against the idea that by sheer empiricism one day the eating of this seed blended to another may well have triggered in this particular man a drawing of something new, which later of course became a part of that particular local culture.

Once you have done that, all sorts of things can happen later on so that in later times you don't need the triggering mechanisms any more. Because it will come from the environment.

But at the beginning I don't see why it could not start with some happenstance like that. (pages 68-70)

BROWN: As a psychiatrist I'm particularly curious about your work with John Perry. How did you first meet him?

CAMPBELL: That was a marvelous meeting. Mike wrote to me one time and said he'd like me to come out and talk with John Perry, a psychiatrist in San Francisco, about schizophrenia. I said, I don't know anything about schizophrenia. He said, Well, he'd like to have me give a lecture anyhow. I said, Well, how would James Joyce be? And he said, That would be just fine.


So I agreed to come out and talk with John Perry. And Perry sent me some of his monographs, his articles, on the symbolism of schizophrenia. The sequence with which these images emerge in a patient's mind, who's in a deep schizoid crack-up. And it matched The Hero with a Thousand Faces, just like that, step by step.

And so there again I came to understand the relationship with something that had been simply a scholarly interest of mine in mythology to actual life problems.

And it's been pretty exciting ever since.

BROWN: That's really how I got acquainted with you. In the middle of the 1960s I read a book of yours, Primitive Mythology from the Masks of God, and it sounded like what my patients in psychoanalysis were telling me.

CAMPBELL: Yes. That's marvelous. Actually I guess the big crisis in my popular career came in the 1960s when people were taking LSD and my book The Hero with a Thousand Faces became a kind of triptych or mythological map for the hippies. (page 143)





Compilation copyright © 1995 – 2001 CSP

http://www.csp.org/chrestomathy/heros_journey.html

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How myth became the legend of Joseph Campbell




He’s half-Scottish and his work was the force behind star wars. So why haven’t we heard of him?
By Allan Burnett



Imagine the past quarter-century without Star Wars. Ronald Reagan wouldn’t have had a catchy name for his apocalyptic missile defence programme, none of us would have squabbled over the Darth Vader mask at Hallowe’en and nobody in America would care who Ewan McGregor is. And that’s not to mention The Matrix or The Lord Of The Rings, because without Luke Skywalker it’s unlikely Neo or Frodo would have got anywhere near the big screen. Love or hate George Lucas’s ever-expanding space opera, the one thing you can’t do is underestimate the power of the Force. But why exactly does it have such immense cultural resonance? The answer lies not with special effects, but with the eternal, mysterious and indestructible power of myth.
One man produced the myth that is key to the Star Wars universe. It was not Lucas, but his mentor – his personal “Yoda” – the late anthropologist Joseph Campbell.

Campbell was born 100 years ago this month, and it is testament to Lucas’s acknowledgement that this once-obscure, half-Scottish, quiet academic is the subject of a glitzy, sell-out centenary celebration in the US hosted by the educational foundation set up in his name. A friend to the Steinbecks, his past admirers also include Jackie Kennedy Onassis and John Lennon – a nod to the fact Campbell was a cult figure even before Star Wars made him a worldwide celebrity.

The first child of a middle-class Catholic couple in New York, the young Campbell became consumed by myth when he was taken to see Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Upon seeing the figure of a naked American Indian, “his ear to the ground, a bow and arrow in his hand, and a look of special knowledge in his eyes”, he began a lifelong obsession with ancient cultures.

Already immersed in the rituals, icons and traditions of his parents’ Catholic heritage, he read all he could on Native Americans and even started his own pretend tribe. Fascinated with totem poles and masks, he was hooked by the direct experience “primal” people seemed to have of myths.

Campbell went on to study at Columbia, and in Paris and Munich, becoming an expert in Arthurian studies. It was during his time in Europe in the 1920s that he was exposed to the ideas of people such as Picasso and Freud, whose work was to have a profound influence on him. Returning to the US in 1929, and with the onset of the Depression giving him little hope of finding a teaching job, he decided to hit the road in an effort to discover “the soul of America” and in the process, hopefully, discover his own purpose in life. He eventually reconnected with the academic world and made his reputation in 1949 by publishing The Hero With A Thousand Faces.

That book posited that the concept of the heroic journey occupies the heart of all the world’s cultures. Moreover, the stages of this journey, or mythic cycle, are essentially the same in every culture – whether it be the creation myths of Native Americans or the Book of Genesis. So what makes one culture different from another is not an exclusive set of mythical principles, but a distinctive inflection on the universal “monomyth” that moves us all. The wrappings are different, he explained, but underneath it is the same diamond.



When Lucas reread the book in 1975, after he had first come across it while studying anthropology at college, it gave him the focus he needed to turn his sprawling fantasy universe into one coherent, powerful story. Above all, a story that felt real.

Campbell had argued that the travails of Odysseus or the legends of King Arthur were not meant to be taken literally – you wouldn’t go into a restaurant, he famously explained, see “steak” on the menu and then eat the menu. Rather, their truthfulness emerges when they are understood as metaphors for human action that work in terms of deep psychological principles.

Lucas realised that if his space-age fantasy could pull the same psychological triggers, audiences would respond to the trials and tribulations faced by Luke Skywalker during his quest to defeat Darth Vader in much the same way as bygone generations had to the journey of awakening undertaken by Christ, the Buddha or Telemachus. Lucas followed Campbell’s blueprint for the hero’s journey of initiation, departure and return exactly – and the result was a sensation.

After the release of Star Wars, Campbell credited Lucas with reinvigorating the mythic force in the modern world and they became friends. “It’s possible that, if I had not run across Joseph Campbell,” admitted Lucas, “I would still be writing Star Wars today.”

To Campbell, the value of Star Wars was obvious. Although the mythic structure is universal, he argued, the myth itself has to be kept fresh through constant reinterpretation. Myths help youngsters become part of society, and adults come to terms with their place in the world. In a society which had lost faith in traditional religions, the universal myth needed to be recontextualised to provide a road map for our times, and this was precisely the achievement of Star Wars. A modern myth had been created for Western society.

Nevertheless, the general sparsity of myth in the West remained a source of concern to Campbell until his death in 1987, as if something valuable had been lost. Campbell did not want modern states to return to being theocracies, which he regarded as monoliths rightly consigned to history by the triumph of Western individualism, but he wanted their mythical structures to be refurbished.

In the past, he argued, Greek, Latin and Biblical literature had been learned by everyone and gave perspective to our everyday lives. The art and literature based on these traditions created mythologies, which were creative manifestations of humanity’s universal need to explain psychological, social, cosmological and spiritual realities. Later, the great coming-of-age novelists took up these mythological functions: from Scott to Joyce and Thomas Mann.

Today, the heroic journey is realised through film and the temple of the cinema. “When a person becomes a model for other people’s lives,” said Campbell, “he has moved into the sphere of being mythologised.” The person you are looking at on screen is with you, but also somewhere else at the same time. “That,” he concluded, “is a condition of the god.”

Throughout time, myths have helped us locate our place in the world because they are, Campbell believed, “the world’s dreams”: archetypes which form the building blocks, not only of the unconscious mind, but also of a collective unconscious shared by people of different cultures everywhere. In this, of course, Campbell drew on his own mentors; in particular, Carl Gustav Jung, who believed that everyone is born with the same basic subconscious model of a hero, a mentor and a quest.

With its reverence for psychoanalysis, this was all very mid-20th century. But there is no doubt Campbell had discovered a theory of enduring power. He believed consciousness was a form of energy permeating the entire living world. From there, it was only a short leap to Star Wars’s mystical Force .

Campbell also acknowledged his debt to James George Frazer, spiritual inheritor of the Scottish Enlightenment and arguably the founding father of social anthro pology. It was during Campbell’s Depression-era “wilderness years” that he read Frazer’s magnum opus, The Golden Bough. Living in a shack without running water in the wilds of Woodstock, Campbell went through a “spiritual transformation” thanks in large part to having read Frazer’s revelations about the nature of magic and the legend of fertility, birth, marriage, death and rebirth shared by almost all religions. Frazer’s comparative mythology has since been criticised, but it helped Campbell rediscover his calling in life. Given his debt to Frazer, and his own Scottish roots, it is curious that Campbell remains relatively obscure in Scotland, the country where Enlightenment sociologists first considered the function of myth by studying the tribal society then lingering in the Highlands. But is this just evidence of the reticence that can creep in when an academic is embraced by popular culture – or does it suggest something more?



Certainly, Campbell had a tendency to over-interpretation, and the latitude afforded by his broad theory seemed to give him an answer for everything. You could be left wondering whether he was really an eloquent charlatan, who cherry-picked bits of myth and cultural ephemera to justify his ideas. It’s not a million miles away from accusations that fellow New Yorker and pop-culture guru Andy Warhol used his own art to make spurious connections between soup cans and Marilyn Monroe.

Yet something tells you that Campbell, like Warhol, had a genuine insight into the mysteries of our cultural present. Both reacted against devout Catholic backgrounds, both constructed personal mythologies and both shared a fascination for the way in which rituals and symbol- worship – whether of a soup can, a film star or a Luke Skywalker doll – have been refreshed to meet the needs of a materialistic, post- modern world. And both of these cult figures died in the same year. Now what’s the mythological significance of that?

The author would like to acknowledge that part of this article draws on material from the website 'Star Wars Origins', which can be found at http://www.jitterbug.com/origins

28 March 2004

http://www.sundayherald.com/40821

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African

http://www.katyberry.com/Goddesses/African.html

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THE DOGON TRIBE OF WEST AFRICA



The Dogon are a tribe from the Republic of Mali, West Africa, where they settled at Bandiagara Plateau. They are believed to have arrived there sometime between the 13th and 16th centuries. The area where they live is desolate, arid and rocky.

These people are generally classed by anthropologists as primitive but are they as primitive as they suggest or not. These people seem to have knowledge of the Solar System and Sirius in particular which may place this tag as irrelevant.

Dogon Creation Myth.

A rough idea of their creation myth is as follows:

The Dogon hold a belief that the Supreme God Amma created Earth and then married her. However the clitoris of Earth rose up against the divine phallus and as a consequence Amma had to cut it from her before he could take possession of his new wife. From this union of Amma and Earth was born Yurugu, who would introduce disorder and chaos. It was after this that Amma re-fertilised Earth by the way of rain and the following result was twins, these were one female and one male who would become the model for all future creations. These twins would be labelled Nommo.

Nommo in respect to their mother Earth then used a fibre skirt with which they covered her nakedness. Seeing this and disliking it Yurugu then commits the first act of incest, which brings about the evil Spirits of the Bush and as a result of Earth now being impure the emergence of menstrual blood. Amma then decides to leave Earth and carry on with the Creation on his own. He firstly creates eight ancestors, four of which are female and four male. These ancestors then give rise to eighty descendants from which the world’s population would arise.

The Nommo then decide to send down the first Smith who comes down by an Ark via the Rainbow and has with him copies of all living things, minerals and techniques. He is the one responsible for the foundations of all social structures and as such is classed as a Dogon hero.

Marcel Griaule and Germaine Dieterlen
The two people named above are two French Anthropologists who would bring the myths and secrets of the Dogon tribe to the view of the civilised world. From 1931 they would spend around 21 years studying all aspects of the Dogon and learning their ways. Only after many years of study and gaining their trust would the Priests of the tribe invite them to learn their secrets. This is when the anthropologists would notice very interesting and astonishing knowledge which the Dogon say has been passed down from generation to generation. The first writings from the anthropologists on the Dogon tribe would be published in 1950 and these would create a storm that is still causing chaos in the modern world today. These secrets would show that for a primitive society they have remarkable knowledge of the Solar System and Sirius.

What they know.

The Dogon show in their secret myths that the brightest star in the sky Sirius (The Dog Star) has a companion, which cannot be seen with the naked eye. They know that this star is small dense and very heavy, in fact they say cannot be lifted by all the people of the world. This star is called Po to the Dogon tribe but was only discovered by the western world sometime in the 19th century and is now called Sirius B by modern astronomers. With this second star Po the Dogon also show another body, which has yet to be discovered by modern astronomers. However, some of them do believe that there maybe a third, for which they call Sirius C. This is due to the irregularities of the other two.

Their secrets of the Solar System in general are quite impressive.

They also go on to say that the Moon is ‘dry and dead like dry blood’.

They draw Saturn with a ring around it.

Show Jupiter as having four moons. ▪ (See note below).

That stars in the sky spin.

That the Earth moves around the Sun.

They also seem to know that Earth spins on its axis, the stars are infinite in number and that the Milky Way has a spiral force, which Earth is connected. This is just some of the knowledge their secret teachings portray. There drawing to show Sirius is an egg shaped ellipse, which the Dogon say is the orbit, they then place Sirius within this exactly where it should be rather than where you would place it as a guess.

Where did they get this knowledge?

Well the Dogon believe this knowledge has been passed down to them from generation to generation, but was originally taught them by amphibious beings called Nommo who came to Earth from a planet which is within the Sirius star system. Now many people will think this is absurd, as do many scientists and astronomers, who say that this information must have been passed to them somehow by way of other civilised societies over time. However these secrets were only given to the anthropologists after many years of gaining their trust, which gives a rather good idea that these are true myths and secrets of the Dogon rather than things picked up over many years from meetings with other more modern civilisations.

It is also worth noting that other tribes in Africa do show some similarities in their beliefs, and so do Greeks, Babylonians and maybe Egyptian in the way of amphibious creatures giving them knowledge.

The Babylonians believed Oannes who was the leader of the Annedoti founded civilisation, and for them this deity is portrayed as being fish-like.

Robert Temple who wrote the Sirius Mystery also considers that ancient Egyptians may have known of Sirius B and portrayed it in their mythology.

The Dog God Anubis was associated with Osiris, who in turn is associated with the Goddess Isis. So can we presume that as Isis is identified with Sirius, that her companion could be pointing out Sirius B.



After word

If you would like to find out more information about the Dogon tribe it would be worth consulting the two French anthropologists books on the subject, as more detailed information would be available. If however you just want to know more on the amphibious alien beings or Sirius you could try reading Robert Temple’s “Sirius Mystery” or the books of Erich Von Daniken. However as far as detailed information that is worthwhile it would be best to stick to the books by Robert Temple.

▪ I would also like to say that, the four moons of Jupiter, were spotted by Galileo, but today Jupiter is known to have at least 14 moons.

Written by Sage Robert Worrall

http://www.gnosticrob.com/mythology/dogontribe.html

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Ancient Lithuanian Mythology and Religion

The Lithuanian pagan faith and mythology, as well as the ritual connected with them, are among the oldest phenomena of human spiritual creation. Religious and mythic imagery permeated all the spheres of society life that was based on hunting and gathering already during the period of the early tribal system which comprised the Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic.

The history of Lithuanian faith and mythology can be subdivided into three epochs. The first epoch is that of the early matriarchal tibal system, during which religious imagery (totem, animist and craft cult imagery) connected with feminine supernatural beings appeared in the hunters' and gatherers' society (the Upper Palaeolithic and the Mesolithic). The second epoch was that of the late matriarchal tribal system, based on hoe agriculture, during which religious imagery connected with the cult of feminine deities of the Sun, the Moon, the Earth developed as well as those representing fertility and water. In the period of matriarchy the goddesses were responsible for the birth, existence and death of man, fauna and flora. Those deities took care that the continuity of life and fecundity be maintained in the Universe through constant interchangeability of life and death. The goddesses supervised the sky, the earth, water, fire and the atmosphere. Art, especially the symbolic art, was created in the sphere of the cult of feminine divinities, while the rites of this cult was performed by women themselves survived into the the period of patriarchy.

http://www.litnet.lt/litinfo/religion.html

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This list of deities aims at giving information about deities in the different religions cultures and mythologies of the world. It is sorted alphabetically.

http://www.freeglossary.com/List_of_deities

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The White Goddess - Articles - Owls - Symbology and Mythology

http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/articl ... =Mythology

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Alchemy is a major unifying theme of anthropology. Alchemy, initiation and religion are intertwined. An understanding of any one necessitates an appreciation of the other two.

He also visit the esoteric doctrines of the Knights Templar, Freemason and Kabbalah in unusual and insightful ways.

The book provides Robert Word's translation of the Triangular Manuscript of St Germain, the only text available. Only in this book will you find the solution to Shugborough Hall's famous Shepherds of Arcadia Monument, which reveals Mount Cardou's treasure near Rennes le Chateau. Where else can you find what Rossyln Castle's ceiling mermaid has in her handbag?

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/2020/

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Now if this ain't enough info to see just how much everything we know is based on symbolism, myth and the like and how truly we live in a global world if not an awesomely interconnected universe and cosmos, then I don't know what is. This ties in nicely with the Akashic -field by Ervin Laszlo, the Implicate and Explicate orders by David Bohm, and the Morphogenetic Field by Rupert Sheldrake not to speak of the "blueprint" of existence referred to in the Lyricus teachings.. These scientists; the first two being theoretical physicists and the later a biologist, are the fore runners to something that brings all of those specialized fields together and bridges science and religion and shows us what awesome beings we truly are in a universe that knows it. The coherence of an energetic heart opens one up to an awesomeness beyond words for the knowledge available to such a loving and knowing being.



[Edited on 4-10-2006 by Shayalana]

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http://www.floating-world.org/Teachings.htm

Enjoy.:)

[Edited on 10-10-2006 by Shayalana]

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My 'toot' for a thanks too...;)

The White Goddess is quite the forest. A big one. I think I see/sense Russ' interest. Celts/Druids. Something in the land an air around.....

I did like this out of 'floating-world'......

[quote]Empty your mind of all thoughts.
Let your heart be at peace.
Watch the turmoil of beings,
but contemplate their return.

Each separate being in the universe
returns to the common source.
Returning to the source is serenity.
If you don't realize the source,
you stumble in confusion and sorrow.

When you realize where you come from,
you naturally become tolerant, disinterested, amused,
kindhearted as a grandmother,
dignified as a king.

Immersed in the wonder of the Tao,
you can deal with whatever life brings you,
and when death comes, you are ready.''
___________

-LAO TZU from The Enlightened Heart . ©1989 Stephen Mitchell


http://www.floating-world.org/alokeia.htm[/quote]

Interesting site. Had to grin when I went into 'links' and saw an awful lot in common. The ''Messages from Michael'' are especially close, as it was after reading that book.., I began to use the computer for something other than playing Mah Jong. The search for more 'Michael' material led me to Spirit Web and I got lost in that site. Tried to log in as 'moon' but got rejected. 'moonz' was born. (haha, and occasionally some of you have to bear with it....;))


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Hey moonz always happy to be of service , Lao Tzo is one who resonates so much with me. :)

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What is especially and delightfully interesting about all of this is that now is the time for us to create our own for where we are going has NO PAST.

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On a much much lighter note and more conducive to a brighter, not, fear driven future, the content of this website was purposely made out to be myth because of the threat it was to big monied concerns who would suffer greatly if this information was manifested in physical reality.
Quite the opposite of the above post .

http://www.world-action.co.uk/energy.html

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"Oneness, Truthfulness and Equality"


Cathedral - CS&N
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MaSU0ABrnY


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 12:35 pm 
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on an even slyter note Shay, think of this. The link is basically about suppression. Doesn't matter of what nature. Makes a case for 'oppression apprenhension'.
Don't you think ''what you resist persists'' is the same thing as ''the truth will out''.?? Apparently ''eventually'' is inevitable. :P:P:P

Haha.., speaking of 'nature' and of your above post of the 10th and LaoTzu and the fact he sorta 'resonaturated' within himself, would you think that LaoTzu went to the Zualot as a child? I wonder if early disciples of his could have been called ''Zualots''.??
Ahhh, in a way.., what have become known today as ''Jesus Freaks'' were perhaps preceeded by 'Zualot Zealots'.
They were of course preceeded by lotsa 'Zeusalots'.
And just to keep your toes twinkling and yer gnosis from wrinkling.., let me ask you if you know the difference between 'zealot' and 'zeal'.....?

Well..., I'll tell ya what I think.

A zealot with zeal can zealot but can't zeal......:o

z ya roun'......:)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 12:32 am 
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OK moonz it is all getting rather old for I feel something so different rising up and through my soul. There are no rules, only the ones I see that apply in the moment and are conducive to all concerned. For that is in my best interersts for who would I have to share with otherwise? Anyway time to move on and on and on, afterall change is a constant and I am so much in the throes of it.:)

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"Oneness, Truthfulness and Equality"


Cathedral - CS&N
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MaSU0ABrnY


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 6:56 am 
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http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Li ... hi_bye.htm

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