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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 3:14 pm 
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I like the Transition Movement because it isn't limited to only living in the country. More people live in cities and towns and hamlets or whatever other small communities there are and this movement is very applicable to them. Not everyone can afford to buy or live in the country. It's about being part of a community and how people in communities can get to know each other and pool their resources which is not only money, but talents, services, products etc. This is about localization instead of the mass production of less quality goods for profit first from corporate ownership very far removed from the best interest and health of people. Some of the Transition communities have even created their own means of digital exchange instead of in pounds, dollars etc. It's quite fascinating and really brings people together who find ways to co-operate and collaborate that works for everyone. When I move to a small town some hours away from this city I now live in, I am seriously contemplating starting a Transition movement there. There are many farmers that might be interested as well, including a dear uncle of mine. We don't have to reinvent the wheel. Below is a video link to show what the movement is about. This shows that there are some wonderful things happening on the planet there are people transforming in a positive way... :? }

https://www.transitionnetwork.org/transition-2

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 3:35 am 
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I love this! There are more than a few grassroot things happening in terms of sustainability and localization of growing organic food and other sustainable practices such as ways to recycle water from the air or fog, solar panels that are rolled up and unrolled for disaster or emercency situations, and research and experimentation to produce inexpensive solar panels. It looks like they are here to stay as a power source a clean one at that.

http://www.overgrowthesystem.com/welcome#future

http://www.overgrowthesystem.com/blog/

Cuba’s Big Lesson, Authentic Teachers, and “Solar-Powered Carpets”

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Solar power is easier to install than ever before thanks to the latest innovation: the Roll-Array. John Hingley and his team at the renewable energy company Renovagen designed a high power PV array that rolls out like a carpet. This flexible and easy-to-transport instant microgrid has the capacity to bring alternative energy to places we never thought possible. Check out the video below to see it in action.

The Roll-Array is easily towable by a standard 4×4 vehicle such as a Land Rover. When connected to the back of the car, the flexible solar panels are pulled out of a spool and create ground cover in a matter of minutes. On their website, Renovagen claims the panels will be able generate up to 100kWp – 10 times more power than other transportable solar panels on the market today.

Not only is this new technology installed quickly, but the fuel cost savings during transportation is noteworthy. The tightly wound solar spools can be carried by the 4×4 vehicle attached to a small air pallet trailer in tow, which eliminates the need for large diesel generators.

According to Renovagen, a standard rigid solar field takes 22 hours of man-power to install, while the thin, flexible sheets roll out in just 2 minutes. Once spread onto the ground, the panels can be bolted or staked to withstand winds of over 80 mph. After just five minutes of installation by two people, the panels are ready to generate solar power. Batteries and inverters are attached to the base of the panels.

This ingenious development is of course ideal for large areas of flat ground, such as remote camps or military bases. They also have the potential to provide instant energy in areas hit by natural disasters. Hingley tells the Guardian, “It is like a microgrid in a box. It has all of the components integrated into it that you need to run a 24 hour microgrid.” Renovagen is now crowd-funding for the Roll-Array on Crowdcube.

http://inhabitat.com/solar-energy-rolls ... ovoltaics/


Natural Swimming Pools: 9 Myths Busted

Do you like the idea of a natural swimming pool but get squeamish thinking about mud between your toes and tadpoles clinging to your hair? Environmentally friendly, chemical-free natural swimming pools have low ongoing maintenance costs and are healthy alternatives to conventional pools. They’re fairly common in Europe but less so here in the U.S., largely because of misconceptions. Follow along as we bust some common myths about these beautiful outdoor features.

http://www.houselogic.com/photos/pools- ... expensive/

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MaSU0ABrnY


Last edited by Shayalana on Thu Apr 14, 2016 6:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 1:42 pm 
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How can we get the most out of our farmland without harming the planet? I traveled to rural Mexico to learn from indigenous farmers.

Affectionately called “Professor” by his neighbors, Josefino Martinez is a well-respected indigenous farmer and community organizer from the remote town of Chicahuaxtla, in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. He watched with patient attention as I showed him photographs of Soul Fire Farm, my family’s organic farm in the mountains of upstate New York.

“Western agronomists would have us believe that Triqui farming practices are irrelevant today.”

I tried to convince Martinez that our farms had a lot in common. “Like you, we have marginal mountain soils and steep slopes, and we’ve worked for years to build up the fertility,” I explained.

Martinez finished his simple breakfast of fresh corn tortillas with black beans. Then he rose, donned his baseball cap and undersized school backpack, and took me out to see the land he cultivates. I quickly came to understand that my idea of “marginal soils” and “steep slopes” were naive, if not laughable. It was the height of the dry season and Martinez’s land was hard, brittle, and gray. The farm was literally etched into the mountainside, with a slope so severe that plowing with tractors or animals was impossible. Yet his storage room was full of maize, beans, dried chili, squash seeds, and fresh fruit that he’d grown right here.

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Josefino Martinez explains how the pine trees he planted just three years ago are stabilizing the soil on the mountainside. Photo by Leah Penniman.

When I asked how this was possible, Martinez explained that he simply farmed in the manner of his ancestors, the indigenous Triqui people.

Western agronomists would have us believe that Triqui farming practices are irrelevant today, but I thought they might be part of the solution to the nascent global food crisis. I spent the first half of 2015 in southern Mexico on a Fulbright fellowship to exchange ideas with indigenous farmers like Martinez on how get long-term high yields out of difficult farmland. I was fed up with our society’s obsession with corporate, industrial agriculture, which is flooding vulnerable communities with unhealthy food, destroying natural resources, and undermining the independent family farm.

According to a detailed report by my favorite think tank, the World Resources Institute, the first thing to know about the impending food crisis is that the human population is expected to reach 9.6 billion by 2050. That’s a 37 percent increase from 2012, when it reached 7 billion. Even imagining massive redistribution of food resources, the world will need to produce 69 percent more calories by 2050 to feed all those people.

But agriculture already accounts for a nearly a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions and 70 percent of freshwater use globally. So if we simply increased the scale of what we’re doing now, the ecological effects would be catastrophic. The report goes on to describe a “menu of solutions” that farmers can follow in the future to grow more food without using additional land, water, and fuel.

I had a hunch that rural farmers in Mexico were already modeling some of these practices and not being credited. While it was difficult to leave behind the daily responsibilities of tending the land, I knew that only grassroots farmer-to-farmer exchange could solve the world’s food crisis. So, with my husband and children at my side, I left behind our farm in New York and traversed the windy mountain roads of Oaxaca to trade ideas on how to feed our communities with dignity and take care of the earth at the same time.

What I learned gave me hope. Here are three items from WRI’s list of solutions that the farmers I met are already doing—and one that isn’t on their list but probably should be.

1. Farm like a forest

Not accounting for land covered by water, desert, or ice, about half of the planet is dedicated to pasture and croplands, according to WRI’s study. And the continued expansion of agricultural land is driving biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, an increase in “cropping intensity” could avert the need to clear an additional 62 million hectares for crops by 2050. That’s an area about the size of France. In other words, farmers need to start growing different plants one after another on the same land, as well as growing them closer together at the same time, a practice known as intercropping.

Oswaldo Flores, a Zapotec indigenous man from the village of Yaviche, explained how his community uses intercropping and agroforestry to grow more food without expanding into new lands.

“The forest pulls clouds from the sky so that they drop rain on the fields below,” Flores said, while showing me his shade-grown coffee farm.

The farm is a cafetal, a shady, multistory system with tall, purple-podded guajinicuiles and fruit trees forming the upper layer, coffee trees at the intermediate layer, and smaller food plants and vines (chiles, chives, chayotes) near the ground. The trees protect the plants below from high winds and cold temperatures, and their fallen leaves provide a natural compost that inhibits weed growth, adds fertility, and retains soil humidity. Guajinicuiles also fix nitrogen, making it available in organic form in the soil. This system of shade-grown coffee is almost equal to the native forest in terms of biodiversity, and maintains habitat for migratory birds.

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This degraded land in the Mixteca was restored to lush vegetable gardens under the direction of Jesús León Santos. Photo by Leah Penniman.

At the edge of Flores’ cafetal, the vegetation transitioned to another complex and even more ancient intercropping system. The milpa is a Mesoamerican technology that integrates maize, beans, squash and other complementary food crops. While estimates of its age differ, it is at least 3,000 years old. The intercropped milpa system is multilayered, with maize in the upper canopy, beans in the intermediate story, and squash at the bottom. Bean plants fix atmospheric nitrogen and help reduce damage caused by the corn earworm pest (Helicoverpa sea). Squash plants inhibit weed growth with their dense network of thick, broad leaves and retain soil humidity. Natural chemicals (cucurbitacins) washed from the leaf surface act as a mild herbicide and pesticide.

The first step for León Santos and his farming community was to build trenches, stone walls, and terraces to stop the erosion of the remaining soils and to slow water runoff so aquifers can recharge. He stabilized these barriers with tenacious local vegetation, such as the sweet-smelling vetiver grass, which withstands drought, flooding, and mudslides.

Once stabilized, the barren hillsides were reforested with native tree species, like nitrogen-fixing alders (Alnus acumilata) and pines (Pinus oaxacana). The CEDICAM community saves its own native crop seed, using an in-the-field selection process that has persisted regionally since the pre-Columbian era. They preserve and exchange the best seeds of maize, beans, squash, chile, tomatillo, chayote, squash, sunflower, and prickly pear, as well as local specialties like cempoalxochitl, quintoniles, and huauzontle.

The farmers further improve the soil by planting and tilling in “cover crops,” which add nutrients and organic matter. Some native varieties are especially good for this, like the “frijol nescafe,” ( Mucuna deeringiana) a nitrogen-fixing bean that thrives in dry soil. Finally, farmers add compost and plant debris so that the land is finally ready to receive these carefully maintained crop seeds.

The use of erosion control barriers, intercropping, and seed saving are part of the knowledge León Santos inherited from his Zapotec ancestors. And it’s working. León Santos says he has seen yields increase fourfold after incorporating these ancient and modern sustainable growing techniques. The newly established vegetation sequesters atmospheric carbon and attracts biodiversity.

The art of transforming lands of low ecological productivity into thriving foodscapes is not unique to the Mixteca. León Santos reminded me that the Aztec Empire sustained itself on chinampas, intricate gardens built of vegetation and river muck, essentially artificial islands constructed in shallow lakes. Chinampas are widely considered the most productive form of agriculture ever invented, and are so fertile that they can yield four to seven harvests per year. Indigenous Mexicans have long-standing successes in positive ecological transformation.

4. Cultivate reverence for the planet

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A boy snuggles into his grandmother, who wears the traditional woven huipil of the Triqui indigenous people. Photo by Jonah Vitale-Wolff.

One essential element missing from the World Resource Institute’s otherwise thorough and brilliant “menu of solutions” for the global food crisis was the ethical perspective that co-evolved with best practices in environmental management. This ethic, known as convivencia, or “living together” with both our human and natural communities, is best summarized by Kiado Cruz, a Zapotec farmer from the Oaxacan town of Yagavila:

The ground beneath our feet is our Mother Nature, who has carried us and sustains us. As we work her, we do not profane her, rather we carry out our task as farmers in the context of the sacred. It is corn through which Mother Nature nourishes us. It is flesh of our flesh, because we are people of corn. So we have to collect it in a manner that shows the respect we owe both our soil and our brother corn.

It is with a similar sense of belonging and reverence that I placed corn seeds into our home soil upon return, establishing Soul Fire Farm’s first milpa, an ancient and intricate tangle of complementary sister crops bringing us one small step closer to a sustainable food future.

Leah Penniman wrote this article for YES! Magazine, a national, nonprofit media organization that fuses powerful ideas with practical actions. Leah is a farmer and educator based in the Albany, N.Y., area.

http://www.overgrowthesystem.com/blog/6 ... kaghoq06xf

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 2:36 pm 
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This is less about climate change or weather modification its more about ignorance about the interconnectedness of animals and plants, living things and their cycles and nature, especially resilience, and under and overgrazing of cattle.

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Conservation in the Age of Climate Change: Saving the Cows—and Grasslands—of Rural Zimbabwe

Inside a seven-year effort to restore a landscape beset by desertification and drought.

By Judith D. Schwartz


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Sianyanga is a small community far from any paved road in Matabeleland North, Zimbabwe’s poorest province. The village, part of the Hwange Communal Lands, comprises about 150 households — one household being six or seven family members living in a group of small, thatched huts. From the 1990s until about 2010, along with problems endemic to the region, including hunger and lack of clean water, the people of Sianyanga bore an added affliction: biting ants, or izinyebe, that thrive on bare soil.

These weren’t just annoying bugs that nipped a little. Balbina Nyoni, a single mother who has spent her whole life in the area, told me that being rushed on by izinyebe is like having boiling water poured on the skin; the onslaught has sent men to the hospital. The ants were known to gouge out the eyes of baby goats, killing them in minutes. People who lacked shoes, as Nyoni did, wrapped their feet in plastic to avoid getting stung. Being bitten could mean losing toenails, so open shoes were of no use. Plus, the ants ravaged low-growing staple crops such as groundnuts and cowpeas.

In September 2014, I toured Sianyanga with a group of community leaders. I was there to see the results of a seven-year effort to restore a landscape beset by desertification and drought. An older man paused in a grassy meadow and said, “This used to be so bare you could pick up a needle from the land.”

Thousands are leaving drought-ridden areas for places with more water, prompting fears of unrest in a nation already politically and economically fragile.

A few moments later we were on a narrow path when Balbina grabbed my shoulders and shouted, “Look! An ant!” I had to crouch down and squint to see it scuttling in the reddish dirt. Balbina told me that the ants have recently become quite difficult to find.

It was only then that I noticed that the women were all wearing sandals.

The izinyebe were a symptom of a broader problem affecting both Sianyanga and much of the world’s arable land: desertification, a process in which poor land management, overgrazing, and development combine to disrupt the fragile water cycle of semi-arid areas. Shade trees are cut down, natural grasses are removed for crops, and the soil dries up from the direct exposure to the sun. Once-fertile soil becomes inert dust, unable to sustain life. It primarily affects grassland ecosystems, which represent a significant portion of the world’s land mass; it is an important factor in poverty, conflict, and internal and international migration.

In Sianyanga, Balbina said the decline began in the late 1980s, when the Nalomwe River went dry. The river had provided the community’s water and Balbina used to swim there as a child. Soon the village, formerly productive and dappled with shade trees, could no longer support its livestock. When the rains came, the water carved deep ditches in the Earth. Each passing year meant longer forays for water and forage for their cattle. A 78-year-old man named Thomas Mudimba said: “To get water, if I left at mid-day, I came back from the other village at six in the evening. If I took five animals for water, maybe I come back with two.” For the 20-kilometer journey meant exposing their livestock to predators, mostly lions.

Today, though, the riverbanks are stable and covered with grass, and water flows months longer into the dry season. The revived landscape provides more wildlife habitat, and a variety of animals are returning. The crop fields are more fertile, which means less hunger and poverty. Whereas even five years ago most villagers depended on international food aid, people are now growing enough to feed themselves. “Neighboring communities now come to us for food,” said Busie Nyachari, a young mother. And with better economic prospects, people are less prone to share information with poachers or kill animals for food.

Sianyanga is just one village, and the region’s desertification problems are far from solved. But some hope that the village can be a model for how rural villages in desertified areas can revive streams and rivers and the vitality of their land — not by abandoning their agricultural practices, but by embracing them.

The model that was applied in Sianyanga is called Holistic Planned Grazing, and it was developed by Allan Savory, co-founder of the Africa Centre for Holistic Management in Zimbabwe. As a wildlife biologist working in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) in the 1950s, he observed that, when parkland was safeguarded from roving animal herds, the land deteriorated. He concluded that grasslands and grazing animals evolved together, so that the land needs the animals just as the animals need the land.

At the 7,500-acre Dimbangombe Ranch, the river now extends a kilometer higher than it has in living memory; Egyptian geese and African fish eagles, water-loving birds, have returned.

Over several decades he devised a set of principles for managing livestock so that their behavior mimics that of wild herbivores: they nibble grasses in a way that promotes growth; their waste adds organic matter; and their trampling aerates soil and presses down dead plant matter to be decomposed by soil microorganisms. And the animals are kept on the move, as they would be with natural predators, so plant cover isn’t damaged by continuous grazing.

Today, his approach is being applied on five million hectares (12 million acres) on six continents. Savory’s work in Zimbabwe has won accolades, including the Buckminster Fuller Challenge in 2010 and the Humanitarian Water and Food Award in 2014. With renown comes criticism, and many academics and environmentalists take issue with his ideas. To date, research has added little clarity, in part because studies have focused on a number of different grazing regimes that may or may not follow the same protocols. And the notion that cattle could restore land has rankled those whose experience has led them to expect the opposite.

The prospect of livestock as a restorative tool was also counterintuitive to Savory, who says that he long harbored a strong dislike of cattle. But he came to believe that, in the absence of the vast, wild herds that historically crisscrossed the world’s savanna, steppes, and prairie, ordinary livestock appropriately managed could fill the niche.

Without animal disturbance, according to Savory, old grasses slowly decay without becoming part of the soil, stifling new growth. The result: the plant material oxidizes and the soil loses carbon and water as well as the capacity to support plant and animal life. Whereas plants cool the ground through shade and transpiration, without cover a patch of soil gets a direct hit of solar radiation.

In Savory’s view, while many landscapes are definitely overgrazed, others are undergrazed (or over-rested). Essentially, managing livestock strategically helps resolve a key challenge for people living in seasonal drylands: how to maintain soil moisture and healthy plants from the end of one rainy season to the beginning of the next. The synergy between the land and the vegetation and the ruminant’s digestive process can forestall, and even reverse, desertification in grassland ecosystems.

con't ... https://psmag.com/conservation-in-the-a ... .6fkm3l6vn

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 2:53 pm 
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Monsanto and other American corporations of their evil ilk are just not getting away with it anymore. Europe won't allow them and their GMO products and now Mexico is taking a stand...and winning too!

Court Ruling a Victory for Mexico Farmers and Anti-GMO Activists

Authors: Mercedes López Martínez and Ercilia Sahores

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On March 8, 2016, Mexican farmers, consumers and activists scored a major victory when a federal appeals court ruled that genetically engineered corn can’t be grown in Mexico until a class action lawsuit, filed by scientists, consumers, farmers and activists has been resolved.

The March 8 ruling allows the biotech industry to continue experimental trials of GM corn, but with a new twist—the Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (SAGARPA) will now require regular assessments of the impact of the of the test crops on neighboring non-GM fields and human health.

This recent victory follows a seven-year battle that has drawn together a broad coalition of coalition of individuals and civil society organizations, including scientists, farming groups, beekeepers, indigenous groups, environmental groups, human rights groups and artists bound together by a single mission: to protect the integrity of Mexico’s most popular agricultural crop. The coalition, called Sin Maíz, No hay País (Without Corn, There is No Country), has for years been collecting scientific data about GMOs introduced in Mexico.

The Organic Consumers Association’s Mexico-based team, working through our sister organizations, Vía Orgánica and Asociación de Consumidores Orgánicos, is proud to have played a role in achieving this victory. We also know that this is just the first of many legal hurdles we will have to overcome in our continued battle to defend the integrity and diversity of Mexico’s corn and its connection with an entire culture.

The history behind Monsanto’s Assault on Mexico’s Corn


In 2009, changes in Mexican law allowed biotech giants like Monsanto to conduct trials of GMO corn in approved regions of the country.

Two years later, in 2011, Monsanto and Syngenta asked for a permit to plant GM corn in several states in Northern Mexico. Not surprisingly, they found legal loopholes and sympathetic government officials. The imminent infiltration of GM corn in Mexico threatened Mexico’s ancient tradition of seed exchanges and seed banks. It also threatened to cross contaminate native corn crops, pollute the environment, destroy biodiversity, poison the people and bring poverty to small producers by privatizing corn production through the sale of proprietary patented seeds—just as industrial GMO crops have done in other parts of the world.

This new and imminent threat led to the creation of the 73-member Sin Maíz, No hay País Coalition which has since worked tirelessly to protect and defend Mexico’s traditional corn economy and culture. In July 2013, the coalition filed a lawsuit challenging the government’s process for permitting the planting of GM corn, on the basis that GM corn would threaten biodiversity for current and future generations.

Monsanto and Syngenta responded by hiring the best international and national law firms to fight off the coalition’s team of legal experts, some of whom worked pro bono. The coalition sought national and international funding. OCA has so far contributed $30,000 to support the struggle.

In 2014 and 2015, multinational agribusiness companies, led by Monsanto and Syngenta, filed a number of lawsuits in an attempt to defeat the coalition. They were unsuccessful and instead only strengthened the grassroots group, which gained increasing national and international attention.

As the coalitions’ class action suit gained momentum, it was challenged by more than 70 entities, including Syngenta, Pioneer, DuPont and Monsanto, governmental agencies such as the Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) and SAGARPA.

The formal trial, which ultimately led to the March 8 ruling, began in January 2016.

A heritage worth protecting


Mexico is home to 59 native varieties of corn. The Mexican people have crafted over 600 unique corn-based dishes, creating a rainbow of colors and flavors that come from each unique variety. The story of Mexico’s most commonly produced grain dates back thousands of years, when corn was first domesticated in Mesoamerica. That’s when the relationship between human beings and plants first developed, giving birth to the center of genetic heritage and diversity of corn and a culturally and protein rich civilization.

So central to Mexico’s culture is corn, that it has been the subject of entire books. One of those books, “Men of Maize,” written by Miguel Ángel Asturias and based on the sacred book of the Mayan Popol Vuh, explores the deep connection between the Mexican people and teocintle, as the grandfather of corn

It’s a heritage Sin Maíz, No hay País is determined to vigilantly protect, despite this recent first-round victory. The coalitions demands will not ease until the federal courts:

~ Admit that, voluntarily or involuntarily, significant contamination of non-GM fields has already taken place.

~ Acknowledge that GMO crops affect the human right to conservation, sustainable use and fair and equal participation of biological diversity in native corn because they violate the Law on Biosafety of Genetically Modified Organisms.

~ Acknowledge that agricultural biodiversity will be highly affected by the release of GMO corn.

~ Declare the suspension of the introduction of transgenic maize in all its various forms, including experimental and pilot commercial plantings, in Mexico, birthplace of corn in the world.

For more information:

http://demandacolectivamaiz.mx/wp/
http://viaorganica.org/
http://www.sinmaiznohaypais.org/

Donate to keep Monsanto’s GMO corn out of Mexico.

***
http://regenerationinternational.org/20 ... activists/

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 3:34 pm 
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There are solutions to the changes taking place on the planet if one is open to them. First, we have to stop doing anything that is NOT working with nature and her ways. In other words we have to take the time to study her and see how she works. Fortunately there are people who have done that and are still doing it in various climates all over the planet and discovering ways to work with earth changes because they are here to stay. This video shows radical change from the ignorance of man exacerbated desertization to a virtual green paradise. It shows how to harvest water in a desert and to grow plants indigenous to that hot climate. It shows that solutions are possible.

Greening the Desert

This is just one example of how permaculture can transform the environment, and, in so doing, dramatically change lives. By evidencing the dramatic transformation possible in the world’s worst agricultural scenarios, we hope to make people stand up and listen.

Big Agribusiness would convince us that continuing with fossil fuel dependent monocrop systems and genetically modified crops is the way of the future, but with fuel, transport and fertiliser costs skyrocketing, and growing evidence that genetic tinkering is causing far more harm than good, we, instead, advocate tried and tested methods of working with nature for the benefit of man.

Update: Watch Greening the Desert II: Greening the Middle East, where you’ll learn about the current state of the original Greening the Desert site, and learn more about the work in Jordan and the new PRI project site there.

http://permaculturenews.org/2007/03/01/ ... n-youtube/

Greening the Desert 2:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WBwGB6zC7M

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Last edited by Shayalana on Thu Apr 14, 2016 11:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 3:45 pm 
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Geoff Lawton; Redesigning Resources - Permaculture Ethics, Food and Communities (Video)

This is about an ethical design science that is changing the world , underneath the radar, it's been going on for decades.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIdHaAnNaJo

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:06 pm 
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Empowering Women in Cambodia through Sustainable Rice Farming

April 14, 2016 by Robert Mburia & filed under General



Reduction of poverty, malnutrition and other social ills could be achieved by higher yields with reducing production. Rice paddies account for more than 80 percent of cultivated land in Cambodia and large parts of this land is managed by women. According to Voice of America, an undersecretary of state at the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in Cambodia, Mom Thany, recently stated the importance of women’s role in the agricultural sector at the same time admitting that women should strive harder to “learn new farming techniques, how to adapt to climate change, and so,”.

Tackling the challenges of the smallholder farming still remains a huge task. The task as Rick Bates, a professor of horticulture at Penn State University, puts it is that, it is often called “very resilient poverty traps.” In order to tackle this problem, Bates and his colleagues in research launched a project early this year geared towards improving nutrition and empowering Cambodian women in the four provinces around Tonlé Sap Lake in the northern part of the country, where the poverty rate tops 45 percent in some areas and there are high concentrations of stunting and malnutrition. This project is estimated to be a $1 million project and will seek to work directly with 250 women farmers and it’s expected to be in place until September 2019. Feed the Future Sustainable Intensification Innovation Lab at Kansas State University is the key sponsor and financier of this project. Currently, it funds similar projects in Bangladesh, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Senegal, and Burkina Faso focused on using a farming practice called sustainable intensification, or S.I., to address the food and nutritional security of smallholder farmers.

The goal of sustainable intensification is to increase food production from existing farmland while minimising pressure on the environment. It is a response to the challenges of increasing demand for food from a growing global population, in a world where land, water, energy and other inputs are in short supply, overexploited and used unsustainably. Any efforts to ‘intensify’ food production must be matched by a concerted focus on making it ‘sustainable’. Else our capacity to continue producing food in the future will be compromised. Unlike the System of Rice Intensification, farming practices being promoted in Cambodia include co-planting rice with other vegetables, rotating crops, mulching, composting, and generally focusing on improving soil health over the long term.

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The ‘sustainable intensification’ (SI) approach and ‘climate-smart agriculture’ (CSA) are highly complementary. SI is an essential means of adapting to climate change, also resulting in lower emissions per unit of output. With its emphasis on improving risk management, information flows and local institutions to support adaptive capacity, CSA provides the foundations for incentivizing and enabling intensification. But adaptation requires going beyond a narrow intensification lens to include diversified farming systems, local adaptation planning, building responsive governance systems, enhancing leadership skills, and building asset diversity. While SI and CSA are crucial for global food and nutritional security, they are only part of a multi-pronged approach, that includes reducing consumption and waste, building social safety nets, facilitating trade, and enhancing diets.

Significant financial, ecological, and nutritional opportunity is there. Though the areas the project is focused on have high concentrations of stunting and malnutrition, they also boast the country’s most fertile soil and abundant water resources. Despite this, Cambodia imports roughly about 70% of its vegetables. This is partly due to the fact that increased monoculture farming has wiped out the indigenous vegetables that formed the backbone of the local food system. Soil degradation and pesticide use has left smallholder farmers, the majority of whom are women, especially vulnerable to food insecurity. The reintroduction of traditional and market-demanded vegetables thorough sustainable intensification methods will create more bio diverse farming systems. Meanwhile, rice, which Cambodia has been exporting more of in the last several years and which represents a large component of the diet, will prove a key testing ground for sustainable intensification technologies.

Bates states of the project that an ecologically sensitive approach to sustainable intensification in Cambodia is therefore paramount —one that can address pressures on the environment, greatly reduce reliance on harmful inputs, and improve household food and nutrition security by either encouraging production for household consumption, or providing economic opportunities in SI value chains, or both. The project team understands that applying sustainable intensification principles in Cambodia isn’t just about ecological resilience. The broad objectives of the project includes objectives towards improving the socioeconomic and nutritional status of women and their families through increased production, food, and economic security, and further overcoming the limits towards women’s accessing various links in the agricultural value chain, including markets. The broader goal of the project adopting this approach is to serve as a model for the entire country and region.

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Bates states that Cambodia uniquely represents a best-case scenario for promoting sustainable intensification through the increased involvement of women, who already play a significant and often nearly autonomous role in agriculture in much of the country. When women farmers have the same access to resources as men do, they can increase yields on their farms by 20 to 30 percent, and in Cambodia, unlike many other developing nations where women are smallholder farmers, women often control the household finances. That puts them one step closer to improving the living conditions for their families: Studies show that when women have control over their family’s income, they spend 90 percent of it on their families, compared with the 30 to 40 percent that men spend, and children’s health and nutrition improves. Good news is that, there is government supports towards these efforts. The Cambodian government supports efforts like these. In late 2015, it set out policies to improve the circumstances of women in rural areas and encourage more women in agriculture.

Source:
http://www.takepart.com/article/2016/03 ... ce-farming
http://www.futureoffood.ox.ac.uk/sustai ... sification
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3514000359




http://permaculturenews.org/2016/04/14/ ... e-farming/

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 7:29 pm 
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Now for something quirky.

Flame-powered WiFi router in 1.5 ton boulder hides survival guide library

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n an increasingly digital world where it seems like you can connect to the Internet almost everywhere, the only place where you can get a digital detox is in nature. Or is it? Not if Berlin-based media artist Aram Bartholl has his way. Best known for works like "Dead Drops", which involves a public file-sharing network of USB flash drives embedded in innocuous crannies all over the world, Bartholl recently debuted a rather curious work: a 1.5-ton rock that doubles as a WiFi router and is powered by fire.

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Located in a forested spot by a river at the Springhornhof outdoor museum, the "Keepalive" rock requires that visitors brush up on their survival skills to build a fire in order to activate its thermoelectric generator, which powers the router. As long as the fire is hot enough, the router will keep running. Says Bartholl on Hyperallergic:

It’s not about easy access. It has a whole dystopian idea to it, like, will we need something like this in the future? Or somebody finding this in a hundred years – is it still working and they figure something out and they make a fire, or is there going to be a moment where we’re going to need to make fire again to get access to the data?

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The rock router is built on the Piratebox platform, which allows people to create DIY offline wireless networks. Though the Keepalive rock doesn't connect to the wider Internet per se, when it is on it does permit users to upload and download files via their smartphones into this stone database. What's even more quirky is the fact that the rock stores a library of survival guides, in PDF format -- some of them relevant to wilderness survival and some not. It's perhaps a darkly ironic nudge at the current state of humanity's evolution; eons of hard-learned human survival skills have come to this strange intersection of technology and nature. In a way, the stone is also a kind of survival grail, a destination in of itself:

In 'Keepalive' the stone itself becomes the data medium. In a very archaic, but at the same time clandestine manner, information can be exchanged only locally - in contrast to networked servers, services and clouds worldwide, this rock is not connected to the internet. You have to get close to nature in the countryside, find the stone and make a fire to activate the data source.

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According to Bartholl, the idea for Keepalive came from images he saw of people firing up BioLite stoves to charge their phones during the 2012 Hurricane Sandy disaster. “It was funny — the power goes out, and people would buy these little stoves and make a fire to charge their phone,” he says.

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For now, the rock remains in place, waiting for intrepid data explorers to discover it, and perhaps contribute to its hidden library about the future survival of our species. More over at Hyperallergic and Aram Bartholl.

http://www.treehugger.com/gadgets/flame ... tholl.html

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2016 11:12 pm 
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It’s the Time of the Season and the Moon is Bright: Time-Stacking, Planting by the Moon and Other Marvels Tic Toc-ing Along

To be completely honest, the time element of permaculture is something that hasn’t gotten its due attention from me, but coming to this realization, it’s also an idea that I’m spending more and more moments pondering. No doubt, timing can make a huge difference when planting, creating guilds, pruning, harvesting, and countless other –ing activities. The cycles of the moon, the change of the seasons, the rate at which things grow—they all matter and can be used to our advantage as purposeful cultivators.

My excuse is that I’ve been living in the tropics for too long. The length of days stays relatively the same. The temperature doesn’t fluctuate all that much between times of year. There is rainy season, when everything goes crazy green, and there is dry season, when some the green goes to brown and falls on the ground. And, it was in this change of seasons that I recently became increasingly aware of the need to begin bringing my attention to time along a little further in my practice, regardless of where I am.

The Living Fence and Falling Leaves

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Madre de Cacao, courtesy of Emma Gallagher

At the farm in Belize on which I’ve been most recently working, my wife Emma and I have built gardens that adjoin to chicken yards, which are rotated with layers. Because there are other birds—turkeys and local “meat” chickens—roaming around free all day, we have fenced in our gardens, and excitedly, we’ve done so using living fence posts made from a nitrogen-fixing legume tree, madre de cacao.

Aside from the obvious benefits the fence posts not rotting and the soil amending, the other part of the design I was keen on was the time element. In dry season here, the sun is sizzling, so much so that a local technique is to build shade structures, suspending the palm leaves above crops, in order to subdue lessen the intensity. Because much of our garden was along the fence line, I was excited about the post sprouting shade-producing branches in the dry season to perform this function.

Meanwhile, as the precipitation stays away, the leaves begin to rain, so we rake pathways and patches of grass, using the fallen leaves—particularly the small ones—for mulch, as well as making large piles to produce leaf mold for even better mulching in the years to come. Whatever the case, dry season is the perfect time to get a good cover on the beds. Doing so, as we all know protects the soil from drying out, makes the watering (now a necessity) more efficient, and helps to house microorganisms and soil life at exactly the time it needs it most.

Ultimately, at the onset of wet season, when water becomes overly abundant and the sun much less radiant, the fence posts can be pruned completely back to provide a nitrogen boost for everything, right at the best time to plant, as well as provide chop-and-drop mulch, now that the dry season leaves have stopped falling. The post can be maintained this way throughout wet season, so the sun will be able to get to the plants better, just when that’s needed most.

• I also recalled a project I did in Panama, revitalizing a patch of dried out soil with loads of biomass: I’d used leaves in dry season, and in wet, I’d scavenged the neighbor’s lawn clippings for soil building layers of mulch. The time element hadn’t occurred to me, but the ability to stack the two elements—a carbon and a nitrogen—eventually created pretty well-balanced composted richness.

Experimenting with Time-Stacking

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Watching my Geoff Lawton videos, I also have heard him many times talk about time-stacking elements in swale and berm situations, and obviously, the idea seems both logical and brilliant at the same time. We plant nitrogen-fixing ground cover to boost the perennial food forest that we are trying to grow. So, I’ve also consciously given that a go on my most recent (and much smaller scale than Lawton’s example) swale here.

The berm has been planted with longer term additions, including fruit trees (papayas and tomate de arboles—tree tomato), nitrogen-fixing trees in the form of pigeon peas, and perennial aji pepper plants for the understory (There are already canopy trees). The rest of the berm is covered with several dozen annual legumes—cowpeas, black beans, and pinto beans—that will provide services for the trees as they grow, creating a living ground cover, chop-and-drop mulch, a crop of legumes and soil enhancement.

Elsewhere, our gardens have been cultivated in a similar way. We’ve planted perennial trees like cranberry hibiscus, okra, Chaya, papaya, tomate de arbol and pigeon pea (again, the canopy is already spoken for) and assorted perennial pepper bushes, Malabar spinach, and culinary herbs. Around them, we’ve experimented with hundreds of fast-growing legumes, including mung beans, black beans, pinto beans, urad, cowpeas and red beans. Additionally, we have sweet potato and mustard providing more ground cover and helping to loosen up the clay soil.

Seeing the Moon through Its Phases

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The Blood Moon, courtesy of Emma Gallagher

In our time here, I’ve also become very interested and inspired by palm thatch roofs, and in learning about them, I discovered that the state of the moon has a huge impact on the durability of the roof. The palm fronds must be collected during the full moon, else the roof will suffer from rot and insect infestation. It means the difference between eight or ten years or two or three years. It just amazes me that the moon has such an effect on the palm. Of course, this effect isn’t anything new to agriculture, but it certainly has brought to light my need to be expanding my knowledge.

One of our next plans of action is to begin following the cycles of the moon more closely, using them to our advantage. I have no idea why we haven’t been doing it. Some time ago, I was told that the best time to sow seeds is during a full moon, as the extra sunlight reflected to earth during those nights provided a boost to the process. It makes sense, but it’s something that I need—have long needed—to investigate more, so what better excuse is there than researching an article.

Essentially, what I’ve discovered is that the moon’s effect on gravitational pulls and moonlight are, quite sensibly, at the crux of planting by the moon. While there are much more complex systems than the following, what I’ve come to accept is that I’ve got to take baby steps moving into moon phases. It’s taken me this long to look up this information, let alone to start implementing it. Plus, simplicity just feels better to me.

• The new moon pulls water upwards, causing seeds to swell, which makes it a great time for starting annual crops with seeds outside the fruit, such as lettuces, grains, and cruciferous vegetables. The increasing moonlight also helps to balance leaf and root growth.

• The second quarter, or waxing moon, is a great time for planting, especially getting nearer the full moon. While the gravitational pull upwards is less, the light reflected is more, which encourages leaf growth. This is the best time to plant crops with fruits that have seeds inside, such legumes, stuff from the squash family, and tomatoes.

• The full moon changes the direction of gravity, pushing moisture back into the soil and the roots of plants. Consequently, this is the best time to plant root vegetables, as well as perennials, which will be looking to establish a strong root system before doing to much work up top. It also the best time to prune.

• The fourth quarter, waning moon, is when the gravitational pull has decreased and the light is becoming less and is considered resting period. This phase is best used for preparing beds, weeding, harvesting, and transplanting.

Feature Photo: Time-stacked Garden Bed, courtesy of Emma Gallagher

http://permaculturenews.org/2016/04/08/ ... ing-along/

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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2016 9:49 pm 
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Permaculture: A Quiet Revolution
— An Interview with Bill Mollison


By Scott London

Bill Mollison calls himself a field biologist and itinerant teacher. But it would be more accurate to describe him as an instigator. When he published Permaculture One in 1978, he launched an international land-use movement many regard as subversive, even revolutionary.

Permaculture — from permanent and agriculture — is an integrated design philosophy that encompasses gardening, architecture, horticulture, ecology, even money management and community design. The basic approach is to create sustainable systems that provide for their own needs and recycle their waste.


Mollison developed permaculture after spending decades in the rainforests and deserts of Australia studying ecosystems. He observed that plants naturally group themselves in mutually beneficial communities. He used this idea to develop a different approach to agriculture and community design, one that seeks to place the right elements together so they sustain and support each other.

Today his ideas have spread and taken root in almost every country on the globe. Permaculture is now being practiced in the rainforests of South America, in the Kalahari desert, in the arctic north of Scandinavia, and in communities all over North America. In New Mexico, for example, farmers have used permaculture to transform hard-packed dirt lots into lush gardens and tree orchards without using any heavy machinery. In Davis, California, one community uses bath and laundry water to flush toilets and irrigate gardens. In Toronto, a team of architects has created a design for an urban infill house that doesn't tap into city water or sewage infrastructure and that costs only a few hundred dollars a year to operate.

While Mollison is still unknown to most Americans, he is a national icon down under. He has been named Australia’s "Man of the Year" and in 1981 he received the prestigious Right Livelihood Award, also known as the Alternative Nobel Prize, for his work developing and promoting permaculture.

I sat down with him to discuss his innovative design philosophy. We met over the course of two afternoons in Santa Barbara in conjunction with an intensive two-week course he teaches each year in Ojai. A short, round man with a white beard and a big smile, he is one of the most affable and good-natured people I’ve met. An inveterate raconteur, he seems to have a story — or a bad joke — for every occasion. His comments are often rounded out by a hearty and infectious laugh.

Scott London: A reviewer once described your teachings as "seditious."

Bill Mollison: Yes, it was very perceptive. I teach self-reliance, the world's most subversive practice. I teach people how to grow their own food, which is shockingly subversive. So, yes, it’s seditious. But it’s peaceful sedition.

London: When did you begin teaching permaculture?

Mollison: In the early 1970s, it dawned on me that no one had ever applied design to agriculture. When I realized it, the hairs went up on the back of my neck. It was so strange. We’d had agriculture for 7,000 years, and we’d been losing for 7,000 years — everything was turning into desert. So I wondered, can we build systems that obey ecological principles? We know what they are, we just never apply them. Ecologists never apply good ecology to their gardens. Architects never understand the transmission of heat in buildings. And physicists live in houses with demented energy systems. It’s curious that we never apply what we know to how we actually live.

London: It tells us something about our current environmental problems.

Mollison: It does. I remember the Club of Rome report in 1967 which said that the deterioration of the environment was inevitable due to population growth and overconsumption of resources. After reading that, I thought, "People are so stupid and so destructive — we can do nothing for them." So I withdrew from society. I thought I would leave and just sit on a hill and watch it collapse.

The ethics are simple: care of the earth, care of people, and reinvestment in those ends.

It took me about three weeks before I realized that I had to get back and fight. [Laughs] You know, you have to get out in order to want to get back in.

London: Is that when the idea of permaculture was born?

Mollison: It actually goes back to 1959. I was in the Tasmanian rain forest studying the interaction between browsing marsupials and forest regeneration. We weren’t having a lot of success regenerating forests with a big marsupial population. So I created a simple system with 23 woody plant species, of which only four were dominant, and only two real browsing marsupials. It was a very flexible system based on the interactions of components, not types of species. It occurred to me one evening that we could build systems that worked better than that one.

That was a remarkable revelation. Ever so often in your life — perhaps once a decade — you have a revelation. If you are an aborigine, that defines your age. You only have a revelation once every age, no matter what your chronological age. If you’re lucky, you have three good revelations in a lifetime.

Because I was an educator, I realized that if I didn’t teach it, it wouldn’t go anywhere. So I started to develop design instructions based on passive knowledge and I wrote a book about it called Permaculture One. To my horror, everybody was interested in it. [Laughs] I got thousands of letters saying, "You’ve articulated something that I’ve had in my mind for years," and "You’ve put something into my hands which I can use."

London: Permaculture is based on scientific principles and research. But it seems to me that it also draws on traditional and indigenous folk wisdom.

Mollison: Well, if I go to an old Greek lady sitting in a vineyard and ask, "Why have you planted roses among your grapes?" she will say to me, "Because the rose is the doctor of the grape. If you don’t plant roses, the grapes get ill." That doesn’t do me a lot of good. But if I can find out that the rose exudes a certain root chemical that is taken up by the grape root which in turn repels the white fly (which is the scientific way of saying the same thing), then I have something very useful.

Traditional knowledge is always of that nature. I know a Filipino man who always plants a chili and four beans in the same hole as the banana root. I asked him, "Why do you plant a chili with the banana?" And he said, "Don’t you know that you must always plant these things together." Well, I worked out that the beans fix the nitrogen and the chili prevents beetles from attacking the banana root. And that works very well.

London: You have introduced permaculture in places that still rely on traditional farming practices. Have they been receptive to your ideas?

Mollison: I have a terribly tricky way of approaching indigenous tribal people. For example, I’ll go to the Central Desert, where everyone is half-starved, and say, "I wonder if I can help you." And I’ll lie and say, "I don’t know how to do this?" And they say, "Oh, come on, we’ll make it work." By the time it’s done, they have done it themselves.

I remember going back to a school we started in Zimbabwe. It’s green and surrounded by food. The temperature in the classroom is controlled. I asked them, "Who did this?" They said, "We did!" When people do it for themselves, they are proud of it.

London: For some people — particularly indigenous tribes — the notion that you can grow your own food is revolutionary.

Mollison: When you grow up in a world where you have a very minor effect on the land, you don’t think of creating resources for yourself. What falls on the ground you eat. And your numbers are governed by what falls on the ground. Permaculture allows you to think differently because you can grow everything that you need very easily.

For example, the bushmen of the Kalahari have a native bean called the morama bean. It is a perennial that grows underground and spreads out when it rains. They used to go out and collect it. But after they were pushed off their lands to make room for game and natural parks the morama bean was hard to find. I asked them, "Why don’t you plant them here?" They said, "Do you think we could?" So we planted the bean in their gardens. Up to that point, they never actually thought of planting something. It stunned them that they could actually do that.

The same thing happened with the mongongo tree which grows on the top of sand dunes. They had never actually moved the tree from one dune to another. But I went and cut a branch off the mother tree and stuck it in the sand. The thing started to sprout leaves and produce mongongo nuts. Now they grow the trees wherever they want.

London: You once described modern technological agriculture as a form of "witchcraft."

Mollison: Well, it is a sort of witchcraft. Today we have more soil scientists than at any other time in history. If you plot the rise of soil scientists against the loss of soil, you see that the more of them you have, the more soil you lose.

I remember seeing soldiers returning from the War in 1947. They had these little steel canisters with a snap-off top. When they snapped the tops off, they sprayed DDT all over the room so you never saw any more flies or mosquitoes — or cats. [Laughs] After the war, they started to use those chemicals in agriculture. The gases used by the Nazis were now developed for agriculture. Tanks were made into plows. Part of the reason for the huge surge in artificial fertilizer was that the industry was geared up to produce nitrates for explosives. Then they suddenly discovered you could put it on your crops and get great results.

London: So the green revolution was a kind of war against the land, in a manner of speaking.

Mollison: That’s right. Governments still support this kind of agriculture to the tune of about $40 billion each year. None of that goes to supporting alternative systems like organic or soil-creating agriculture. Even China is adopting modern chemical agriculture now.

London: I remember the late economist Robert Theobald saying to me that if China decides to go the way of the West, the environmental ballgame is over.

Mollison: I overheard two "Eurocrats" in Vienna talking about the environment. One said, "How long do you think we’ve got?" The other said, "Ten years." And the first one said, "You’re an optimist." So I said to them, "If China begins to develop motor vehicles, we’ve got two years."

London: What kind of overconsumption bothers you the most?

Mollison: I hate lawns. Subconsciously I think we all hate them because we’re their slaves. Imagine the millions of people who get on their lawn-mowers and ride around in circles every Saturday and Sunday.

They have all these new subdivisions in Australia which are between one and five acres. You see people coming home from work on Friday, getting on their little ride-on mowers, and mowing all weekend. On Monday morning you can drive through these areas and see all these mowers halfway across the five acres, waiting for the next Friday. Like idiots, we spend all our spare time driving these crazy machines, cutting grass which is only going to grow back again next week.

London: Permaculture teaches us how to use the minimum amount of energy needed to get a job done.

Mollison: That’s right. Every house should be over-producing its energy and selling to the grid. We have built entire villages that do that — where one or two buildings hold the solar panels for all sixty homes and sell the surplus to the grid. In seven years, you can pay off all your expenses and run free. They use this same idea in Denmark. Every village there has a windmill that can fuel up to 800 homes.

London: The same principle probably applies to human energy as well. I noticed that you discourage digging in gardens because it requires energy that can be better used for other things.

Mollison: Well, some people like digging. It’s a bit like having an exercise bike in your bedroom. But I prefer to leave it to the worms. They do a great job. I’ve created fantastic soil just from mulching.

London: Does permaculture apply to those of us who live in cities?

Mollison: Yes, there is a whole section in the manual about urban permaculture. When I first went to New York, I helped start a little herb-farm in the South Bronx. The land was very cheap there because there was no power, no water, no police, and there were tons of drugs. This little farm grew to supply eight percent of New York’s herbs. There are now 1,100 city farms in New York.

London: Short of starting a farm, what can we do to make our cities more sustainable?

Mollison: Catch the water off your roof. Grow your own food. Make your own energy. It’s insanely easy to do all that. It takes you less time to grow your food than to walk down to the supermarket to buy it. Ask any good organic gardener who mulches how much time he spends on his garden and he’ll say, "Oh, a few minutes every week." By the time you have taken your car and driven to the supermarket, taken your foraging-trolley and collected your wild greens, and driven back home again, you’ve spent a good hour or two — plus you’ve spent a lot of money.

London: Even though permaculture is based on scientific principles, it seems to have a very strong philosophical or ethical dimension.

Mollison: There is an ethical dimension because I think science without ethics is sociopathology. To say, "I’ll apply what I know regardless of the outcome" is to take absolutely no responsibility for your actions. I don’t want to be associated with that sort of science.

London: What do you think you’ve started?

Mollison: Well, it’s a revolution. But it’s the sort of revolution that no one will notice. It might get a little shadier. Buildings might function better. You might have less money to earn because your food is all around you and you don’t have any energy costs. Giant amounts of money might be freed up in society so that we can provide for ourselves better.

So it’s a revolution. But permaculture is anti-political. There is no room for politicians or administrators or priests. And there are no laws either. The only ethics we obey are: care of the earth, care of people, and reinvestment in those ends.


http://www.scottlondon.com/interviews/mollison.html

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Cathedral - CS&N
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 Post subject: Re: Sustainability and Cultural Creatives
PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 9:32 pm 
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This is very interesting about solutions for the planet in terms of creating new energy sources, recycling water and purifying it in the process, and using technology instead of being used by it for the benefit of all, and using AI with it serving humans and not humans serving it. It's about being interactive with the planet and the benevolent universe for the benefit of the species of the planet.

Intellitrees: A “smart tree”, terra-forming, biomimicry, ecotechnology for free energy, safe AI, and human sovereignty

VANCOUVER, BC – In an Intellitrees interview on NewsInsideOut.com with Alfred Lambremont Webre, new energy inventors and activists Gary Voss & Jeff Louis together with new media journalist Donny Gillson introduced the Intellitree, a new “smart tree” terra-forming and free energy technology they describe as a safe conduit for AI Artificial Intelligence that enriches the biosphere and ecosphere, and empowers human sovereignty.

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https://newsinsideout.com/2016/06/intel ... vereignty/

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MaSU0ABrnY


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